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Calendar of Events

Upcoming events

    • Thursday, September 09, 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom

    Sponsored in partnership with the Boston, California, Chicago, New York, Philip Lee Phillips, Rocky Mountain, and Texas Map Societies

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  7:00 pm ET/6:00 pm CT/5:00 pm MT/4:00 pm PT

    Title: James Monteith: Cartographer, Educator, and Master of the Margins

    Speaker:  Andrew J. Rhodes, member of Washington Map Society Board of Directors and author of an article on Monteith in the latest issue of Cartographic Perspectives

    James Monteith (1831–1890) was a leading figure in American geography education in the late nineteenth century, but his career has been largely forgotten and his contribution to cartography has been underappreciated. His geography volumes included unique illustrations to help the reader visualize terrain on a continental scale and place individual maps in a global context. Monteith's maps were surrounded with remarkable symbology and amplifying data that ought perhaps to earn him the title “master of the margins.”


    Planning to attend?   

    RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.


    • Thursday, October 07, 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom

    Sponsored in partnership with the Boston, California, Chicago, New York, Philip Lee Phillips, Rocky Mountain, and Texas Map Societies

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  7:00 pm ET/6:00 pm CT/5:00 pm MT/4:00 pm PT

    Title: How Tourist, Business, and Colonization Maps Shaped North American Views of Cuba, 1898-1913

    Speaker:  Anthony Mullan, Library of Congress (retired), Washington, D.C.

    This presentation surveys a selection of maps associated with North American investment, colonization, and tourism in Cuba during the first 15 years following the Spanish American War. During this period, the United States intermittently occupied and contemplated annexing the country.  Various railroad, steamship, and land companies, as well as journals such as the Cuba Review, began to publish maps of Cuba, which emphasized how seamless and effortless travel could be to Havana and beyond. This presentation shows how these maps helped to make certain towns and scenic areas tangible to the American traveling public. Maps were often part of promotional literature leading tourists, colonists, and investors to have certain expectations of a new Cuba in which they could experience a healthy, safe, and modern land of abundance, but whose long history with Spain and multi-culturalism were either minimized or erased.

    Planning to attend?   

    RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.


    • Saturday, November 13, 2021
    • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM (EST)
    • Zoom

    Organized in conjunction with the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division and Johns Hopkins University

    Sponsored in partnership with the Boston, California, Chicago, New York, Philip Lee Phillips, Rocky Mountain, and Texas Map Societies

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  2:00 pm ET/1:00 pm CT/12:00 pm MT/11:00 am PT

    Title: Mapping Ourselves: A Cartographic Introduction to the 2020 Census & Tapestry Segmentation Analysis

    Speakers:  Meagan Snow, Geospatial Data Visualization Librarian, and John Hessler, Specialist in Computational Geography and Geographic Information Science, Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress

    The 2020 Census, along with the American Community Survey, provide a snapshot of the demographics of the American population like no other sources available. Combined they tell the story of the spatial distribution of everything from health care, cell phone ownership, housing expenditures and the level of poverty in the United States by age, gender and race. John Hessler and Meagan Snow have spent this last year advising and training Congressional staff on the data and how to efficiently visualize and map it for policy analysis. The first talk by Hessler, will present an overview of the computational and statistical methods used to create the data and the theory behind segmentation analysis. The second talk by Snow, will focus on visualizing and understanding the data using GIS and other cartographic tools.

    Planning to attend?   

    RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.


    • Thursday, December 09, 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EST)
    • Zoom

    Sponsored in partnership with the Boston, California, Chicago, New York, Philip Lee Phillips, Rocky Mountain, and Texas Map Societies

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  7:00 pm ET/6:00 pm CT/5:00 pm MT/4:00 pm PT

    Title: The Florida Origins of North American Cartography

    Speaker:  Peter A. Cowdrey, Jr., Archivist, Cognetta Family Trust Collection of Historic Florida Maps, Tallahassee, FL

    From tiny, isolated points on the Florida peninsula, the Spanish claim to “La Florida” grew so that by the late 16th century it stretched from the Florida Keys to Virginia and from the Atlantic Coast to the Trans-Mississippi West. Map archivist Peter A. Cowdrey, Jr. will guide participants on an exploration of the beginnings of North American cartography as well as detail the growth and diminution of Spanish Florida. Utilizing the impressive collection of Florida maps spanning multiple centuries from the Cognetta Family Trust Collection, this presentation will feature maps from the early 16th century to the early 1800s.


    Planning to attend?   

    RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.


Have an idea for a program?  

Please send suggestions to Ronald Grim, WMS Program Chair by Clicking Here.


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