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Calendar of Events

Upcoming events

    • Monday, May 17, 2021
    • 6:20 PM - 7:00 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  6:20 pm ET/5:20 pm CT/4:20 pm MT/3:20 pm PT

    Details: All members of the Washington Map Society are encouraged to attend the Annual Meeting. During the meeting the board will review the past year of events, the society's financial status, and the slate of Directors up for election. WMS members will be asked to vote for the Directors at the end of the meeting.

    The Annual Meeting will start at 6:20 PM and precede the general meeting with Matthew Gilmore. The Zoom link will be the same for both meetings. If you have already registered for the Matthew Gilmore lecture, you do not need to register again for the Annual Meeting. To register for either meeting, please RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. The confirmation will read that the meeting starts at 7:00 PM, but that is the time for the general meeting with Matthew Gilmore. The annual meeting will start at 6:20 PM and the Zoom room will open at 6:15 PM. Please sign in between 6:15 and 6:20 PM.


    • Monday, May 17, 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom

    Sponsored in partnership with the Boston, California, Chicago, New York, Philip Lee Phillips, Rocky Mountain, and Texas Map Societies

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  7:00 pm ET/6:00 pm CT/5:00 pm MT/4:00 pm PT

    Title: Tilting Washington’s National Mall

    Speaker:  Matthew Gilmore. Washington, DC, author, columnist, speaker, and blogger.

    One of the major decisions the Senate Park (or McMillan) Commission made in 1901 was to create a new centerline for the National Mall, around which to shape its design. Instead of drawing it directly east/west from the Capitol, continuing the line of East Capitol Street, they deflected it southward to pass through the Washington Monument. This was to cope with the design flaw of the misplaced Washington Monument. This was not entirely new... a few others seem to have considered this as a solution before the Commission did.

    But most other planners had a raft of other ideas whether to or how to cope with the "misplacement" of the Washington Monument, generally designing around it, but not reorienting the entire landscape.

    This new centerline (and the width of the Mall proposed by the Commission) became a key design element and determined the location and (even) design of the buildings on the Mall--including the Department of Agriculture and the New National Museum (now the National Museum of Natural history). It was a factor in the location of the Grant Memorial. It determined the location of the Lincoln Memorial. In the process, the highest politicians in the land were involved. And ultimately, President Theodore Roosevelt was required to make the decisive move to enforce it.


    Planning to attend?   

    RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.


    • Thursday, June 24, 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom

    Sponsored in partnership with the Boston, California, Chicago, New York, Philip Lee Phillips, Rocky Mountain, and Texas Map Societies

    Location: Zoom

    Time:  7:00 pm ET/6:00 pm CT/5:00 pm MT/4:00 pm PT

    Title: “nearly in a circular form”: Mapping the Cherokee Nation through John Marrant’s Narrative (1785)

    Speaker:  Leah Thomas, Assistant Professor of English, Virginia State University, and Editor, The Portolan

    Comparing contemporaneous maps of the southeastern United States with John Marrant’s narrative mapping in his A Narrative of the Lord’s Wonderful Dealings with John Marrant, a Black (London, 1785) offers insight into his location and travel especially among the Cherokee and their networks.

    Taken into captivity by the Cherokee, Marrant is saved by the Chief’s daughter, echoing John Smith’s The Generall Historie (1624) during a pivotal moment in the colonial contest in the Southeast. Living among the Cherokee for approximately two years, Marrant hunted and traveled with them. His narrative mapping reflects the mapping in the 1720s deerskin maps attributed to the Catawba and Chickasaw that may have been of Cherokee origin.

    Marrant’s travel with the Cherokee during the 1760s reveals emergent settler tensions with the Cherokee from their friendship with the British and negotiations with South Carolina Governor Francis Nicholson in the 1720s to their removal in the 1830s.


    Planning to attend?   

    RSVP to John Docktor at washmap@gmail.com to receive the Zoom meeting ID and passcode.


Have an idea for a program?  

Please send suggestions to Ronald Grim, WMS Program Chair by Clicking Here.


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